Showing posts with label Cooking. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Cooking. Show all posts

Wednesday

Homemade Tomato Paste

I sent my best friend a pic of my chili today which included a jar of my homemade tomato paste. Her immediate question was why had I not yet put that instructional on my blog.

As I’m clearly obligated to do.

Her wish is...almost...my command.

In the "good ole days" before I was a single mom working full-time and going to school...I would have just taken the time to make y'all a batch complete with step-by-step pictures.

But you're not getting that from me.

I will tell you that you won't regret making your own homemade tomato paste. It's easy, it tastes amazing, and is full of so much more flavor and health than the store-bought version. (That last part is totally scientific. I know because I made it up. But it sounds like it would be true.)

I mean just LOOK at the color in that sauce!

Homemade Tomato Paste, Canning

Homemade Tomato Paste, Canning
You can really see the color here after it's opened.
Homemade Tomato Paste, Canning, Vegan, Sweet Potato Chili, Crockpot
Tomato Paste topping Vegan Sweet Potato Chili
And no...making it isn't extremely difficult and doesn't even require canning. You can keep the final product in the fridge or freezer should you so desire.

Over on The Kitchn, Marisa McClellan does an excellent job of doing MY old job. She'll tell you how to make and preserve Tomato Paste and even has excellent links through her post on how to make and preserve other homemade tomato products including Tomato Sauce.

This blog is an excellent resource for those looking to cook from scratch and preserve foods!

Friday

Why I Will Never Make a "Good" Recipe

The way to guarantee that I will never make your recipe on All Recipes is to classify it as the "Best Ever" or the "Most Outrageous" or "Tasty".  Putting those words on the recipes implies that the end result MUST be good.

What happens if it's not?

I could just be normal and say the recipe was crap and was never good in the first place; let alone the "Best Ever".  I could say that by "Most Outrageous" you actually meant...worst recipe anyone would ever make.  I could assume that when you said "Tasty" you meant to the neighborhood dog.

The problem...is that I have issues.  Normal has never come close to describing me.  If the "Best Ever", "Most Outrageous", and "Tasty" recipe came out bad then I would assume that I had made a mistake.  This assumption would confirm that I am the worst cook ever in the history of cooking.  My self-esteem would take a nose-dive. 

Look.  I said I have issues.  I don't kid about such things.

If you want me to try your recipe, label it as "Horrible", "Tasteless", "Bland", or "The Worst Recipe Ever".  This almost GUARANTEES that I will try your recipe.

If I manage to make the end result edible, then I feel GREAT!  I took something that was horrible and made it edible.  Talk about an ego booster!

And FYI:  If you tell me in the recipe that I "may NOT" make substitutions or that "no substitutions" are allowed, you have GUARANTEED that I WILL substitute.  Just because I can.  So take THAT!  I don't EVER follow a recipe exactly as written so why would I allow you to DEMAND that I not substitute?  Psh!

What?  Don't look at me like that!  I TOLD you I have issues!  One of those issues happens to be over-analyzing recipes.  And not doing what I'm told.  And changing things just because I can. 

God bless my family who eats my concoctions.

Thursday

SOS Mom Saver: How to Use Up Everything In Your Kitchen

http://www.supercook.com/We've all had that random can of food that has been stuck in the back of our pantry for months.  Perhaps you purchased it for a special dish that you never made.  Or..you're a super-couponer like someone I know & got paid to take something home...but don't quite know WHAT to do with it.  Or maybe you're just having a tight month.  You have GOT to make the most out of every ingredient in your kitchen.  But how?

(imagine cheesy movie-announcer voice) SuperCook to the rescue!

No.  Really.

SuperCook is a cook's best friend! 

You can enter in ANY ingredient (or several) into their recipe search.  It will give you a list of what items you can cook with that ingredient.  It will start with the recipe(s) that require nothing BUT what you entered.  If what you entered alone can't make a meal, it will give you results starting with recipes that require the least amount of ingredients to those that require more.

You can also add exclusions so that the recipe results that come up will only be those that fit with your family's dietary needs.  (For example, ours says no shellfish because I have an allergy, no gluten because our daughter has an allergy, & no soy because it's a migraine trigger for me.  If I'm cooking for others, I'll often remove the gluten exclusion.) 

When you enter an ingredient, it will also ask if you have other items that would be useful for creating recipes with that ingredient.  It might help you remember that you have butter, olive oil, or a specific spice...but forgot to add them. 

I think my favorite feature for those on a budget, though, is the "shopping list" which you can get if you sign up (for free).  You enter the ingredients that you have on hand & they'll give you suggestions for what you should buy to make the most of the ingredients you already have on hand.

Seriously AWESOME site!

(Non-necessary but necessary disclaimer:  I don't have any kind of a relationship with SuperCook other than the fact that I love their site and they don't appear to mind.  They didn't compensate me for this review or ask me to do this review.  In fact, I'm fairly certain they don't even know about its existance.  If, however, they would LIKE to compensate me for this review, I would not be opposed to that & would be happily willing to change my disclaimer.<-------That's a hint, SuperCook!)

SOS Mom Saver: Easy Egg Substitute

Given the current egg shortage due to a recall of 380 million eggs because of salmonella, I thought I'd repost this as a reminder for anyone who may find themselves without eggs, but still needing to cook:

I know we've all been there at one time or another. You start baking the cupcakes for your child's class tomorrow & realize you're out of eggs...or that one of your dear family members put the EMPTY egg carton BACK in the fridge. (Ahem...my husband...)


You either don't feel like running to the store when you've already started baking, or you're a one-car family like us and can't because your spouse has the car.

What do you do? Are you stuck? Do you HAVE to run to the store?

I actually discovered the simple solution to this problem for a much different reason. We were poor. Like dirt poor. It cost $350 just to feed and medicate our infant son every month and our grocery budget (including food, paper products, cleaning products, personal hygene, & diapers) for the ENTIRE family was only $200 a month. Those numbers added up to us having to make some hard choices and drastic sacrifices, and led to us finding cheap alternatives to keep us going.

We can afford to buy eggs now, but still use this substitute when baking because no one can tell the difference. Why use our expensive, organic eggs when something else will do?

You need these 3 ingredients:


Water, corn starch, & a tablespoon. And no...you don't HAVE to use bottled water. I don't use bottled water. You get a picture of the bottled water instead of my sink because my dirty dishes-filled sink just wasn't as pretty.


You'll need 1 tablespoon of corn starch per egg in the recipe.


Doesn't that look so pretty?


Dump the corn starch in a bowl. (That's the "official" method. You're supposed to mix the corn starch & water together in a separate bowl before adding it to the mixture. I did that for you (don't you feel special?), but I don't do that any other time. I just dump both straight into my mix & follow the regular directions from there. I'm all about simplicity. And less dirty dishes.


You'll need 3 tablespoons of water per egg. So...that's 1 tablespoon of corn starch and 3 tablespoons of water per egg. If you need 2 eggs, you'll need 2 tablespoons of corn starch, and 6 tablespoons of water. You get the idea.

And again, the "official" instructions are to dump the water in the corn starch which is in a separate bowl.

If you've followed the "official" method, you'll stir the water & corn starch together and then add them to the rest of your mixture as if the mixture was eggs. Viola! You've solved your problem of not having eggs (or just saved yourself some money).

You can also use ground flax seed instead of the corn starch. However, ground flax seed isn't recommended for pregnant women, and is more expensive & not as shelf-stable so we just use corn starch. (I don't remember why it's not good for pregnant women, I just remember it isn't. Perhaps someday I'll get that information and share it with you. Until then, my dear, close friend Google would be ecstatic to help you.)

Tuesday

SOS Mom Saver: Never Lose Another Piece of Fruit!

We've all had this problem before, and we will have it again. What is it? Wasted fruit.

The kids took ONE bit of an apple & then put it on the counter where it browned.  Is it a lost cause?  They pulled the strawberries out, ate half of them & left the rest on the counter.  They're warm, but not moldy or bad. Do you throw them out?  Put them back in the fridge?  You don't want to waste your money.  You're cleaning out the fridge and find a forgotten pack of raspberries.  They're not bad, but they're old enough that you know no one in your family will eat them.  You let the bananas go just a little too long.  Now, they look brown and nasty on the outside (and probably a little brown on the inside too).  You've got some peaches and plums that are now overripe.  Is there any way to get your family to eat them?

Or...my common problem:  Strawberries are $.99/lb.  Your family eats a LOT of them, but not all in one week.  You hate to lose this great price, but you can only buy so much at one time.

Is there any way to rescue the almost-gone fruit?  Is there a good way to take advantage of that GREAT sale without losing money on wasted fruit?

Absolutely!

You freeze them.  I know this is a LOT easier said than done if you have a giant freezer like mine.  (Side note:  I think a chest freezer is one of the best investments you can make as you move towards more frugal &/or healthier eating.)  Regardless, you can still rescue these fruits (or buy more on sale than you can eat at one time) even if you don't have a giant freezer.  You just have to be more creative with your freezer space.

It is SO simple!  You don't have to blanche the fruits or do anything else fancy to them like you do with veggies.

Here are some simple guidelines regarding freezing fruits and berries:
  • I recommend cleaning all fruits & berries before freezing them.
  • If wet, freeze berries on a wax-paper or parchment-lined cookie sheet and then drop into a baggie once frozen.  If they are dry when freezing, just drop them in a baggie! (Frozen berries taste GREAT on cereal on a hot day!  My husband will take just pour milk over frozen blueberries and make a blueberry ice-cream...the milk freezes because the blueberries are frozen.)
  • Remove pits from fruits such as peaches, plums, and nectarines.
  • If freezing bigger fruits like apples, pears, peaches, plums, nectarines, etc. then cut them up first.  I'll at least quarter the fruit, but you can cut them smaller or even dice them if you prefer. (Frozen, diced fruits make a GREAT "ice cube" for water or tea on a hot day.)
  • You don't have to peel fruits like apples and pears, but if you will only eat them peeled then you should do so before freezing them.
  • Peel bananas before freezing them.  That one's kind of important.  I test it for you so you don't have to.  Trust me, you do NOT want to try peeling a frozen banana!  I usually use them for smoothies so I'll just peel them and throw them into a baggie whole.  I will sometimes cut them & lay the cut slices on a cookie sheet then place them in a baggie when frozen.  Frozen bananas are great with wheaties-type cereals.
  • Don't be afraid of brown bananas.  They are sweeter than non-ripe bananas.  This makes them good for smoothies and banana breads.
  • You can throw any cut, frozen fruit in a blender for a smoothie.  At one time or another, I have put every type of fruit we buy in a smoothie.  (I even put veggies in mine...but that's a topic for another post...)  Bananas and strawberries are kind of the great "neutralizers" in smoothie making.  They'll cover up pretty much anything.  Too sour from too many dark berries?  Add bananas &/or strawberries!
  • Be sure to label your baggies so you know when you froze your fruit.  Even if you go through it quickly like we do, it helps to make sure that you use the older fruit first.  Frozen fruits are generally good for 1 year from the date they are frozen if they are kept in a deep-freeze. 
Happy freezing!

SOS Mom Saver: Homemade Powdered Sugar

Because of our food allergies, we use a homemade powdered sugar icing when we make cakes.  But oh my GOSH powdered sugar is expensive!  There are usually decent sales that I can combine with a coupon to get regular sugar for far under $1/lb.  I have never seen powdered sugar for less than $2/lb.  That's almost TWICE as much!

It is so unbelievable easy to make homemade powdered sugar!  You put the amount of sugar desired into a blender & blend until you have the desired consistency.  If you are planning on storing it long-term, you would want to add 1tbs of corn starch per cup of sugar that you're blending.

Here's a marvelous example of this being done in an uber-awesome Vitamix blender!



For the record, you don't have to have a Vitamix to make powdered sugar from regular sugar.  Any old blender will do.  (However, that doesn't mean that I would turn away a donation or gift of a lovely Vitamix, new or used.)  (Because while my blender will blend powdered sugar...it has issues with blending my spinach!)  (Excuse me while I day dream for a minute about what it would be like to have a Vitamix blender...) (Sigh.)  (I don't think I used enough parenthesis...eseses.  Here's another.)

Okay.  Back to reality! 

A friendly reminder:  Don't forget about the SOS Radio school-supply drive!  You can drop off school supplies at the SOS studios from 9-5 Monday-Friday.  You can find the deals for the week on my blog each Sunday.  Check out this week's deals!

SOS Mom Saver: Frost Cakes Like a Pro!

We've all been there.  We're having a birthday party for our child and really want a professional-looking cake...without the professional price.  You KNOW it can be done.  Johnny's mom made his cake and it looked FANTASTIC!  She's obviously a professional baker in her spare time.  Except she's not.  She just knows how to make cakes look GOOD!

How?  With a few tricks and secrets.

The first rule of decorating a cake is to wait until the cake is completely cooled.  You will destroy the cake if you don't.  I usually cover mine & let it cool for a couple of hours.  Whether you're using home-made or store-bought icing, you want to use it at room temperature.

Once your cake and frosting are ready, you'll frost your cake.  This first layer of frosting is called "masking" or "crumb-coating" the cake.  You'll put a very thin layer on (just enough to gather up all of the cake crumbs into this first layer of frosting).  Then, you freeze or refrigerate the cake.   You can see a fantastic example in the video below (because where else do we learn new things but on YouTube):



How long you freeze or refrigerate the cake (and which method you use) is up for debate.  Some freeze it for 10 minutes, some for a couple of hours.  Yet others say you only need to put the cake in the fridge for 10 minutes to an hour.  The point here is to get the masking layer of icing to fully harden before applying your top (and final) layer of icing.  On the video, she says to put it in the fridge for 30minutes to an hour.  I say find what works best for your area and fridge/freezer and go from there.

We live in Vegas where ice melts instantly upon contact with room temperature and eggs cook before you've even cracked them open into the pan.  As a result, I freeze my cake for a full 2 hours before applying my final layer of frosting.

You'll also notice at the end of the video that she gives you tips on how to smooth the icing over the top edges.  You should do this regardless of how you want the final product to look.  It makes for a smoother, more even top layer.  (You can also use that technique to smooth the edges when putting on your final layer of icing.)

The video below shows one of my favorite methods for smoothing a cake frosted with buttercream icing.



It is so smooth that it resembles the ultra-smooth fondant used on many wedding cakes but without the hassle, nasty taste, and extra cost.  In the video, she shows you how to smooth the icing.  You can use a plain sheet of copy paper, a paper towel (with or without a pattern...your choice), or wax paper.  Each will produce a slightly different effect, but each is just as effective at smoothing a cake.  In the video, she uses what's called a "fondant" smoother (which you can get at any craft store or in the craft section of Wal-Mart).  If you don't have or don't want to get a fondant smoother, you can just use your hand.

You will amaze yourself at how good your next cake looks if you follow these methods.

Find more cake-decorating tips on YouTube!  It's where I've learned all of my "magic"!

SOS Mom Saver: Homemade Popsicles

Feed my kids popsicles for breakfast?  Why not?  

(What kind of a mom ARE you?  You'd feed your kids POPSICLES for BREAKFAST?!?!  I'm not sure I can keep reading your blog!) 

I promise.  I'm not crazy.  In fact, I can almost guarantee that YOU will feed YOUR kids popsicles for breakfast too after I'm done with you.  These aren't your typical "is there even any actual fruit in there" popsicles.  These are popsicles that you and/or your kids make from scratch.  And it's EASY!

The easiest way to make popsicles at home is to use pre-packaged fruit juice that you'd buy at the store.  If you purchase a juice from the "Simply" juice line, the Lakewood "Just" juice line, or the Knudsen "Pure" juice line, then you'll be giving your kids pure fruit juice popsicles.  (The Minute Maid "Simply" juices would be the cheapest of the above.  They're also found at almost all grocery stores.  The others are more costly and aren't carried in all regular grocery stores, but also come in organic varieties.)

I like to go a step further here, though.  I like to find creative ways to use the fresh fruit that I get...especially as it gets past its prime.  (I know every one of us has that apple that gets lost in the back of the fruit drawer in the fridge.)  Many people think these fruits are trash.  The opposite is actually true.  The riper the fruit gets, the sweeter it becomes.  I wouldn't eat it plain, but I'll freeze this fruit straight to use in smoothies or...my kid's favorite...puree the fruit and make homemade popsicles.

The ingredients are incredibly simple:
  • A blender, food processor, or smoothie maker
  • Popsicle holders (or small cups)
  • Lids for the popsicle holders or small popsicle sticks
  • Fruit...Be creative!
  • Some sort of liquid: Yogurt or Kefir can be used for a thicker popsicle.  Juice or water can be used to make it more light.

 
We got these molds on sale at Albertson's for $2.49 each, but you can find them at Wal-Mart, Target, and other discount stores as well.  WARNING:  The lids typically do NOT hold up well!  I would highly recommend that you have wooden sticks on hand because the lids WILL eventually break on these cheap holders.

The fruit is in!  It's ready to go!


It's blending!  (If what you're noticing about this picture is that I don't have a Vitamix, you would be correct.  I don't.  But I do dream about one almost daily when I make my smoothies.  I usually use my food processor for popsicles, but I haven't unpacked it yet.  The smoothie maker will do the job when it has to!)

(Did she just say that she hasn't finished unpacking yet?  Didn't she move in over 2 months ago?  Geez!  What does she do all day?  What kind of a wife and mom IS she?  I'd have the house unpacked by now.)

I'm certain just about anyone would have my (or their) house unpacked by now.  In my defense, this was like our 80th move and frankly, it gets old after awhile.  And you figure you'll just leave stuff in the boxes for next time.


Ready to pour!  This is when the kids run over and try to eat some before we pour.  They usually end up eating a good bit of this "fruit sauce" before I get it all poured.  I fought them off this time just for you.  You should feel special.


Children have been fended off and pouring begins!


They're all poured now and ready for the freezer.  Wasn't that easy?


Once you put them in the freezer, they'll be ready in about 12 hours...although my kids are usually trying to grab their first one well before that.


Doesn't that look delicious!  And it's FULL of nothing but fruit!  How awesome is that?  So go tell your kids they can have popsicles for breakfast now, K?

SOS Mom Saver: Easy Egg Substitute

I know we've all been there at one time or another. You start baking the cupcakes for your child's class tomorrow & realize you're out of eggs...or that one of your dear family members put the EMPTY egg carton BACK in the fridge. (Ahem...my husband...)


You either don't feel like running to the store when you've already started baking, or you're a one-car family like us and can't because your spouse has the car.

What do you do? Are you stuck? Do you HAVE to run to the store?

I actually discovered the simple solution to this problem for a much different reason. We were poor. Like dirt poor. It cost $350 just to feed and medicate our infant son every month and our grocery budget (including food, paper products, cleaning products, personal hygene, & diapers) for the ENTIRE family was only $200 a month. Those numbers added up to us having to make some hard choices and drastic sacrifices, and led to us finding cheap alternatives to keep us going.

We can afford to buy eggs now, but still use this substitute when baking because no one can tell the difference. Why use our expensive, organic eggs when something else will do?

You need these 3 ingredients:


Water, corn starch, & a tablespoon. And no...you don't HAVE to use bottled water. I don't use bottled water. You get a picture of the bottled water instead of my sink because my dirty dishes-filled sink just wasn't as pretty.


You'll need 1 tablespoon of corn starch per egg in the recipe.


Doesn't that look so pretty?


Dump the corn starch in a bowl. (That's the "official" method. You're supposed to mix the corn starch & water together in a separate bowl before adding it to the mixture. I did that for you (don't you feel special?), but I don't do that any other time. I just dump both straight into my mix & follow the regular directions from there. I'm all about simplicity. And less dirty dishes.


You'll need 3 tablespoons of water per egg. So...that's 1 tablespoon of corn starch and 3 tablespoons of water per egg. If you need 2 eggs, you'll need 2 tablespoons of corn starch, and 6 tablespoons of water. You get the idea.

And again, the "official" instructions are to dump the water in the corn starch which is in a separate bowl.

If you've followed the "official" method, you'll stir the water & corn starch together and then add them to the rest of your mixture as if the mixture was eggs. Viola! You've solved your problem of not having eggs (or just saved yourself some money).

You can also use ground flax seed instead of the corn starch. However, ground flax seed isn't recommended for pregnant women, and is more expensive & not as shelf-stable so we just use corn starch. (I don't remember why it's not good for pregnant women, I just remember it isn't. Perhaps someday I'll get that information and share it with you. Until then, my dear, close friend Google would be ecstatic to help you.)

SOS Mom Saver: Honey for Allergies

Have allergies? Eat some honey. No. Really. Raw, local honey (i.e.-native to YOUR area) helps prevent allergies. How? In the same way that allergy shots do...only it's much healthier, in many cases cheaper, and has no side effects!


The way an allergy shot works is by introducing the allergen (what you're allergic to) into your body. They do this a little bit at a time on a weekly basis. Eventually, your body is used to this allergen and no longer has an allergic reaction to it.

Honey works the same way, only naturally. Many of us are allergic to pollens. Bees work by carrying the pollen from one plant to another. This pollen ends up in the honey that they produce. When you have honey daily (a tablespoon a day is recommended), it slowly introduces these pollens to your body. Just as with the allergy shots, eventually, your body will have become used to this allergen and will no longer have a reaction to it.


This is what we use in our area. You can see that the producer clearly labels their honey as raw & unheated. The location information (to the left on this bottle) tells you what area it's from. If the bottle is not clearly labeled as being raw (unheated), then you should assume it's not. It would be labeled that way if it were as that's a MAJOR selling point & major producers know that.

It is important that you utilize raw, local honey for several reasons. If it's raw, then it's not been heated. Heating the honey destroys many of the enzymes and pollens that allow it to be beneficial to your body. You need it to be local so that you're getting the right allergy "shot" (so-to-speak) for your area. It wouldn't make much sense for a person with an allergy to grass to receive an allergy shot for mold instead. The shot wouldn't be beneficial. In the same way, using non-local honey will help you not have an allergic reaction to the pollens in ANOTHER area...which doesn't do you much good if you don't live in that area!

I called and spoke with Dee over at Annsley Naturals Southwest who produces honey in the Henderson, NV area (which covers Vegas as well). She said that not only is the honey good for allergies, but it's great for diabetics. It is the only natural sweetner that most diabetics can safely use. (I'll assume here that we all know the dangers of artificial sweetners. If you don't and would like me to enlighten you, shoot me an e-mail & I'll do a write-up on it.)

Where do you find this fantastic raw, local honey for your area? Once again, Local Harvest comes to the rescue! Enter your zip on their honey page and you'll get the info for local producers in your area. If that doesn't turn up anything in your area, then check out your local health food stores. If that doesn't work, then head to Whole Foods. You can usually also find local honey producers at your local Farmer's Market. Again...Local Harvest can give you that info.

How much?

1 tablespoon a day.

Doesn't that look delicious!

Do I seriously eat a tablespoon of raw honey a day? Yep! In most cases I actually put it in my smoothie. On days when I don't get a chance to make a smoothie, I eat it straight or have a peanut butter & honey sandwich. YUM!

SOS Mom Saver: Homemade Popcorn



Today's Mom Saver isn't just about saving money. It's also about helping your family become more healthy! A LOT of people have the misconception that being healthy costs more. In some cases, that is true. In some cases, though, being healthy can actually save your family money!

I think pretty much everyone has heard the dangers of microwave popcorn bags by now. There are concerns that the chemicals coating the inside of the bag can cause cancer. They also say that the chemical used to make the butter flavor can be problematic if inhaled.

Besides, honestly, which would you rather feed your family?

Microwave & Real Popcorn Comparison Thoughts of THAT Mom
Which would you rather have your starting product be?

Microwave Popcorn in the Bag Next to Real Popcorn on the Counter Thoughts of THAT Mom
I know what MY answer is!

Like most people, I used to think that making my own popcorn would be some time-consuming task that I really didn't want to mess with. Either that, or I had to buy a special popcorn maker. And really? I don't need yet another gadget. I like to keep things simple.

I had heard that you could put popcorn into a brown lunch bag, fold it & cook it in the microwave just as you would a store-bought bag of microwave popcorn. That's all well and good, but we didn't have a microwave at the time and had no intentions of buying one. I needed something else.

I learned that you could very easily make popcorn right on your stove-top!

The only ingredients required are popcorn kernels and a high-heat oil. (I use Safflower oil.) You'll also need a pan with a lid.

Add 3tbs of oil to your pan.


Drop 1 kernel of popcorn into the oil & turn it on to high heat.


Once that kernel pops, then add the other kernels.


They're all in the pan now!


Put on the lid & get ready for it to pop!


(You might need to hold the lid on as the popping corn likes to knock it off. Be sure you wear a glove or potholder while doing this as the oil does splatter if you have any venting in your lid.)


Look at it popping!


You'll be able to easily see when the popcorn is done popping.


Almost Done!


It's done!


The popcorn will have a slight flavor from the oil so butter may not even be necessary.

Dump it into the bowl & enjoy!


How easy was that!

SOS Mom Saver: Freezing Eggs?

Did you know you can freeze eggs? We've been doing it for years! I don't even know when or where I first heard about it, but it's an invaluable tip when eggs go on sale for super cheap!

You'll need the following:
  • A dozen eggs
  • A mixing bowl
  • A fork or wire wisk
  • 2 ice-cube trays
  • An ice-cream scoop is optional, but I always use one to prevent messes.
  • 2 gallon-size storage or 1 gallon-size freezer baggie

Ingredients for Freezing Eggs
You can freeze quantities greater than 12, but the easiest way to freeze them is to do it a dozen at a time.

You put them in a bowl and mix them together as if making scrambled eggs.

Cracking Eggs in a Bowl
That would be all 12 of them. One dozen to be exact. Sorry. I'll stop now.

A dozen eggs in a bowl
You can see a very small part of my helper there. Kirstie LOVES to cook! She wants to own her own restaurant some day.

Whisking Eggs
Once they're well mixed, divide them evenly among 24 ice-cube sections. To make it easier on myself, I just fill 12 in each of 2 ice-cube trays. I usually use my ice-cream scoop to "dip" even quantities into the ice-cube trays & then fill in at the end with a spoon. However, my ice cream scoop has yet to be unpacked. So I'm doing it the messy way today...dumping the eggs into the ice cube tray. I'll spare you THOSE pics!

Eggs in Ice Cube Tray Freezing Eggs
Once all 24 sections are filled, place the eggs into the freezer to be frozen just as you would when making ice from water.

Scrambled Eggs in the Freezer
When both trays are in the freezer, just wait until they are completely frozen solid before moving on to the next step. I typically wait overnight to ensure they are fully frozen. (Imagine Jeopardy music playing here. I find that quite appropriate. Except that I don't think I'd want to listen to that all night. Nevermind.)

Both Frozen Egg Trays in Freezer
The "egg cubes" are frozen!

Frozen Eggs in Ice Cube Trays Thoughts of THAT Mom
Once the "egg cubes" are frozen, pop them out just as you would regular ice cubes & put them in a freezer baggie.

Frozen Eggs in a Baggie Thoughts of THAT Mom
Be sure to label the baggie including the date. Tip: It's MUCH easier to label a baggie if you do so before filling it.

Frozen Eggs Labeled in a Baggie Thoughts of THAT Mom
Eggs can be frozen like this for up to 6-12 months. If you'd like to err on the side of caution, use them within 6 months.

When you're ready to use an egg, you will need to do a little prepping. The night before, transfer the number of eggs you'll need into a bowl in the fridge. (2 cubes is equal to 1 egg.) If you're planning on making scrambled eggs, it's typical to assume 2 eggs for each adult, 1 for each child, plus an extra for good measure. In the morning, they'll be defrosted, ready for a final whip before cooking and; you're good to go!

You'll do the same if you're cooking with an egg(s). You just pour the defrosted egg(s) into your mixture instead of a fresh egg.

If you happen to forget to defrost eggs the night before, they can still be used. For cooking, defrost them in a bowl of hot water. If you're cooking scrambled eggs you can either defrost them in a bowl of hot water or just put the cubes into the pan. They will defrost as the pan heats up. They'll cook "normally" once defrosted without any problems.

Have you ever frozen eggs before? What other unusual items do you freeze?